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differentiable_memory_access [2017/03/07 20:26]
127.0.0.1 external edit
differentiable_memory_access [2018/10/02 10:16] (current)
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 External neural memory structures have recently become a popular tool for algorithmic deep learning (Graves et al. 2014, Weston et al. 2014). These models generally utilize differentiable versions of traditional discrete memory-access structures (random access, stacks, tapes) to provide the storage necessary for computational tasks. In this work, we argue that these neural memory systems lack specific structure important for relative indexing, and propose an alternative model, Lie-access memory, that is explicitly designed for the neural setting. In this paradigm, memory is accessed using a continuous head in a key-space manifold. The head is moved via Lie group actions, such as shifts or rotations, generated by a controller, and memory access is performed by linear smoothing in key space. We argue that Lie groups provide a natural generalization of discrete memory structures, such as Turing machines, as they provide inverse and identity operators while maintaining differentiability. To experiment with this approach, we implement a simplified Lie-access neural Turing machine (LANTM) with different Lie groups. We find that this approach is able to perform well on a range of algorithmic tasks. External neural memory structures have recently become a popular tool for algorithmic deep learning (Graves et al. 2014, Weston et al. 2014). These models generally utilize differentiable versions of traditional discrete memory-access structures (random access, stacks, tapes) to provide the storage necessary for computational tasks. In this work, we argue that these neural memory systems lack specific structure important for relative indexing, and propose an alternative model, Lie-access memory, that is explicitly designed for the neural setting. In this paradigm, memory is accessed using a continuous head in a key-space manifold. The head is moved via Lie group actions, such as shifts or rotations, generated by a controller, and memory access is performed by linear smoothing in key space. We argue that Lie groups provide a natural generalization of discrete memory structures, such as Turing machines, as they provide inverse and identity operators while maintaining differentiability. To experiment with this approach, we implement a simplified Lie-access neural Turing machine (LANTM) with different Lie groups. We find that this approach is able to perform well on a range of algorithmic tasks.
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 +https://​arxiv.org/​abs/​1809.11087 Learning to Remember, Forget and Ignore using Attention Control in Memory
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 +Applying knowledge gained from psychological studies, we designed a new model called Differentiable Working Memory (DWM) in order to specifically emulate human working memory. As it shows the same functional characteristics as working memory, it robustly learns psychology inspired tasks and converges faster than comparable state-of-the-art models. Moreover, the DWM model successfully generalizes to sequences two orders of magnitude longer than the ones used in training. Our in-depth analysis shows that the behavior of DWM is interpretable and that it learns to have fine control over memory, allowing it to retain, ignore or forget information based on its relevance.